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The Connection Between Your Child’s Toys & How They Learn

The Connection Between Your Child’s Toys & How They Learn

The Holiday season is upon us once again, which means millions of parents are asking themselves the question, “Which toy should I get my child?”

This is a question I ask myself year round. Why? Because as a speech-language pathologist, I’m passionate about supplying our clinic with toys that effectively promote communication, learning, and growth, while at the same time engage children and are endlessly fun to play with.

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At the Fire Station!

  • February 25, 2014 |
  • Kerisha Crutcher, M.S., CCC-SLP |
  • Tags: Social Groups

At the Fire Station!

Holy Smokes! Thank you Eastside Fire Department and a special thank you to Fireman Kyle for giving our social group a very unique tour of the fire station! Our kids got a special behind the scenes tour of the fire station next door. 

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How SCT Helps Children with Social Language Disorder

How SCT Helps Children with Social Language Disorder

Social language develops from birth. We observe and respond to our environment, learning the social rules of our culture over time. Social language is an intuitive process and we typically take it for granted. But for children with a social language disorder, it is confusing and overwhelming.

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How SCT Helps Children with Auditory Processing Disorder

How SCT Helps Children with Auditory Processing Disorder

Children with Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), also known as Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD), can leave their teachers, parents, and even therapists scratching their heads wondering what is wrong? Where is the breakdown? These children will often slip through the system without getting the help they need because they are seen as inattentive or “not trying.”

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Speech Sound Disorders – How SCT Helps Children Reduce Sound Errors and Become More Intelligible

Speech Sound Disorders – How SCT Helps Children Reduce Sound Errors and Become More Intelligible

Languages are made up of complex sequences of sounds coming together to form words. When a child is learning their language, they imitate the sounds they hear. In the beginning, this sounds like cooing and babbling; the easiest speech sounds are practiced repeatedly: first vowels, then easy consonant sounds connected to vowels (“dadada”). As children develop, their babbling becomes more advanced adding in more sounds and turning into something that sounds like jabber. Eventually, this baby talk turns into early words, and then more intelligible speech.

Sometimes, children have difficulty with the transition to intelligible speech and they need the help of a speech therapist to guide the way to clear communication.

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Conquering School – Teen-Worthy Advice Written by a Teen

Conquering School – Teen-Worthy Advice Written by a Teen

In a perfect world, achieving success in school, both academically and socially would be as easy as following this formula:

Do Homework » Receive good test grades

Listen in class » Homework is easier

Join a club » Make friends

However, humans are not like computers. One input doesn’t necessarily lead to one output.

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The Written Word – When Speaking Isn’t an Option (Autism Spectrum Disorder and Apraxia)

The Written Word – When Speaking Isn’t an Option (Autism Spectrum Disorder and Apraxia)

Rey is an eleven year old boy who works hard to communicate with others.  It hasn’t been easy for him.  In fact, he has struggled for many years to make his needs and wants known to his family, teachers, therapists and peers without being able to speak. Rey has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Apraxia.

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Stuttering Therapy – How SCT Helps Children Achieve More Fluent Speech

Stuttering Therapy – How SCT Helps Children Achieve More Fluent Speech

It can be alarming to parents when their child begins to stutter. Many children stutter when they are acquiring language. With some key techniques, we can support and help our children through this disfluent period and reduce the risk of prolonged speech problems.

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